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Don't blink or you'll miss the next Kyler Murray headline. Between the Heisman Trophy race, the College Football Playoff, the NFL draft early declaration deadline and the upcoming Major League Baseball season, Murray's name has been at the center of a number of key sports storylines over the past few months.

But while the most popular question surrounding Murray and his future centers around the upcoming decision between football and baseball, there's another looming question that has taken a bit of a backseat. Can Murray, who would be the first QB drafted since 2000 that was 5-foot-10 or shorter, be successful if he ultimately goes the professional football route?

Height hasn't been a hindrance for Murray so far in his football career. He earned Gatorade National Player of the Year honors while winning three straight state titles in high school. And he won the Heisman Trophy during his only season as Oklahoma's starting QB in college. Sub-6-foot QBs have had considerably amounts of success at those levels, though. The same can not be said for the NFL.

Not only that, but there has been some disagreement as to just how short Murray is. Oklahoma listed him at 5-foot-11 on his baseball bio. Then he was listed 5-foot-10 on his football bio. Some talking heads in the media claim he's closer to 5-foot-8. Last month, Oklahoma assistant athletic director Mike Houck took to Twitter to set the record straight, clarifying that Murray officially measured in at just under 5-foot-10 in socks when the Sooner strength and conditioning staff measured him at the beginning of the season.

Assuming Murray goes through the NFL draft process, he'll have his height measured at the NFL scouting combine, which begins on Feb. 26 in Indianapolis. Barring an unforeseen growth spurt, Murray would be looking to become the first 5-foot-10 QB drafted since the Tampa Bay Buccaneers selected Georgia Tech's Joe Hamilton with the 234th overall pick in the 2000 NFL draft. Hamilton went on to appear in one career game, had zero passing attempts and his lone career rushing attempt went for minus-2 yards.

That doesn't make Hamilton unique, though. He was just another casualty in an NFL that's dominated by QBs 6 feet or taller.

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Notable NFL QBs under 6 feet

Russell Wilson (5-foot-11)

In 2018, Wilson set the NFL record for most touchdowns in a season thrown by a QB less than 6-feet tall (35). He broke the record that was previously held by - you guessed it - himself. Wilson threw for 34 touchdowns in both 2015 and 2017, meaning he has had the three most prolific passing seasons in NFL history by a sub-6-foot QB.

Sonny Jurgensen (5-foot-11)

In 1983, Jurgensen became the first QB under 6-feet tall to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The five-time Pro Bowler and 1960 NFL Champion split his professional career playing quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles and Washington Redskins. He led the league in passing yards five different times and was tops in TD passes twice.

Jim Finks (5-foot-11)

Finks is the only other sub 6-foot QB in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was enshrined in 1995, one year after his death. In Finks' final NFL season for the Steelers, he led the NFL in passing completions and yards. After his on-field retirement, he spent 35 years in various front office roles, including playing key roles in the building of Super Bowl teams for Minnesota and Chicago.

Sean Payton (5-foot-11)

Payton has one of the most modest stat lines in NFL history. After brief stints in the Arena Football League and Canadian Football league, he played on the Bears' strikebreaking team of 1987 for three games. His career line: 8-23 passing for 79 yards, 1 INT and 0 TDs. His coaching accolades are much more impressive, headlined by his Super Bowl XLIV title as the Saints' head coach.

Doug Flutie (5-foot-10)

Flutie had the most far-reaching success of any sub 6-foot QB. He won the Heisman Trophy for Boston College in 1984. He then became the highest-paid pro football player as a rookie in the USFL until the league folded. Most of his professional success came in the CFL, where he was a six-time league MVP. He wrapped up his career with an eight-year run in the NFL, highlighted by a Pro Bowl berth in 1998.

Eddie LeBaron (5-foot-9)

LeBaron is a four-time Pro Bowler and won NFL Rookie of the Year honors in 1952 as part of the Redskins. Despite spending the majority of his career in Washington (he's a part of the franchise's Ring of Fame), LeBaron became the Cowboys' first starting QB in franchise history when the team convinced him to come out of retirement in 1960. He ended up playing four years in Dallas.

Davey O'Brien (5-foot-7)

The namesake for the Davey O'Brien Award, awarded to the top collegiate QB, was one of the shortest QBs in NFL history. A Woodrow Wilson and TCU graduate, Wilson (Philadelphia Eagles) had just a two-year NFL career following his Heisman Trophy season in 1938. He had a productive two-year stint, though, earning First-team All-Pro honors in 1939 and Second-team in 1940.

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Non-NFL notables:

AAFC_Ermal Allen (5-foot-11)

Allen's on-field contributions were limited, but he still had a lasting impact on the local sports scene. His one-year playing career was for the AAFC Champion Cleveland Browns. Allen later spent 21 years in the Cowboys organization as RB/QB coach and later ran the franchise's research and development department. He was a part of the franchise for their Super Bowl VI and XII wins.

AFL_Marlin Briscoe (5-foot-10)

As a rookie with Denver in 1968, Briscoe became the first black starting quarterback in the AFL. After setting a Broncos rookie record for most touchdown passes by a rookie, he shifted over to wide receiver, who he played for the rest of his nine-year career that included a Pro Bowl berth and two Super Bowl titles with the Miami Dolphins once the AFL and NFL merged.

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