Oregon Health Authority Coronavirus Update

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PORTLAND — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 511, the Oregon Health Authority reported Monday.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 151 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 on Monday, bringing the state total to 29,484.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported Monday are in the following counties: Clackamas (18), Columbia (1), Coos (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (3), Jackson (4), Jefferson (1), Klamath (1), Lane (19), Malheur (13), Marion (11), Morrow (2), Multnomah (27), Polk (1), Umatilla (23), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (18), and Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 510th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 13, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 511th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 20. More details about her death are pending. She had underlying conditions.

TESTING NOTE: Wildfires and hazardous air conditions have affected COVID-19 testing in Oregon. Over the past several days statewide testing numbers appear to have dipped. This is a lagging data point as tests are often reported several days after specimen collection. However, due to widespread hazardous conditions, people seeking testing may have declined. OHA will continue to monitor the situation.

The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory (OSPHL) is closed today Monday, Sept. 14, due to indoor air quality which is too hazardous to safely use appropriate air safety equipment including hoods. No specimens will be accepted or tested. Specimens already received at OSPHL are being held at appropriate temperatures pending testing. OSPHL will reopen as soon as air safety standards can be met.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

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