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COOS BAY — The National Endowment for the Humanities announced its support last Thursday for the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians Hollering Place Tribal Museum and Cultural Center Development Project.

The NEH grant will capitalize and construct a tribal museum and cultural center at the Hollering Place in the Empire District.

 “This nearly half-million dollar grant will advance the collaborative effort to honor the deep history of Coos Bay and the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians, and I congratulate the Tribes on winning this highly competitive award,” said Oregon’s U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley. “Preserving and teaching our history is an important investment for our communities, and I will continue to use my seat on the Senate Appropriations Committee to help Oregon’s tribal nations develop cultural assets, as a matter of self-determination and sovereignty.”

Working with collaborative partners including the city of Coos Bay, Coos County, the Dolphin Theatre, and the Coos Bay Boat Building Center, the Tribes seek to re-energize the site of one of the area’s oldest and most important settlements; the Hanis Coos Village of Hanisiich.

One hope the tribes have for the Hanisiich Village at the Hollering Place development is to spark redevelopment in the Empire District of Coos Bay.

“The Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians support the employment of more than 180 people in the Empire District of Coos Bay,” said Tribal Chairman Mark Ingersoll. “The Tribes have invested more than $10 million into the revitalization of Empire and we are very grateful to the NEH for their support.”

The tribes would like the Hanisiich Village at the Hollering Place to serve as a cultural gathering place for people to experience, participate, and engage in active learning opportunities associated with the cultures and people who have long called that place home.

CTCLUSI is currently putting in a sea wall at the Hollering Place property that once completed will see the city sign over full ownership of the property over to the tribe.

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Nicholas A. Johnson can be reached at 541-266-6049, or by email at nicholas.johnson@theworldlink.com.

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