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COOS BAY — The Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians want cooperation from the federal government to address their concerns about Jordan Cove's impact on tribal resources.

In a letter to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the Confederated Tribes have asked the agency to work with the tribes to preserve their history, in "government-to-government consultation."

"The Tribe requests this consultation to address grave concerns regarding the Jordan Cove Energy Project and all of its related, and ever-changing, sub-projects," tribal council chairman Mark Ingersoll wrote. "The Project directly threatens the Tribes' significant cultural, historical, and anthropological resources that are located throughout Jordan Cove and within the Project footprint.

"The compartmentalized permitting process and ever-changing scope of the Project makes it impossible to meaningfully identify and comment on impacts and to recommend appropriate mitigation measures."

The letter echoes comments that Ingersoll made at the Energy Facility Siting Council's meeting last month about Jordan Cove's South Dunes Power Plant.

"It's confusing knowing which agency is responsible for what," Ingersoll told the council.

"The tribe has not taken an official position because we don't know enough about it yet. There are so many constant changes."

Tribal chief Warren Brainard also addressed the council, asking that the draft proposed order be withdrawn and postponed. He said the council needs to take into consideration the cultural integrity of the lands for the tribe, as well as the native soils and burial grounds.

"It's important that they be examined and not glossed over," Brainard said.

The EFSC will return to Coos Bay from 8 a.m.-noon Aug. 7 at Red Lion Hotel to further discuss the draft proposed order.

Reporter Chelsea Davis can be reached at 541-269-1222, ext. 239, or by email at chelsea.davis@theworldlink.com. Follow her on Twitter: @ChelseaLeeDavis.

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