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I have chosen a neat picture from my old postcard collection of the SS Elizabeth as it clearly shows the distance between the lighthouse and the tender's home. Often it depends on where the photo was taken as I have seen pictures, taken from the South Jetty which seem to show that the two buildings were nearly side by side, but that was definitely not the case. It's all in the perspective ...

Of all the ships that came into Bandon, the Elizabeth was probably the best known. The 150-foot long vessel was built in San Francisco and arrived in Bandon on New Year's Day of 1904, according to information in Dow Beckham's book on Bandon.

Years later it was sold to a Crescent City, Calif., company, but not before it had made over 700 passenger and freight voyages into the Bandon harbor. Its maiden voyage from San Francisco took 42 hours, and had space for 27 passengers in first class (at a cost of $7.50) and six in steerage.

Today, we may mean Portland when we say we're going to the City, but in those days "going to the City" meant San Francisco, and many Bandon folks made the trip during the years that the Elizabeth served this community.

The second picture was probably taken sometime in the 1940s judging from the vehicles, and it appears to be some kind of a military parade in front of Bandon Market, Ottilie's Beauty Shop and, at far right, the Bob-Otto Court. The building behind the market is now the office of Dr. Sharen Strong. You will also note that Delaware Avenue, which now ends at First Street, was the main access to what was later the old Moore Mill Truck Shop, but in those days the back building housed a beautiful apartment, and the front building was the home of the Nestle's Condensery as well as other businesses over the years.

The building behind Bob-Otto Court was owned by Ernie Panter, but was torn down years ago and is now the location of the Moore Mill office. The Chevron station (most recently the Shell station) now sits on the site where the Bob-Otto Court stood, on the corner of Elmira and Highway 101.

In the background you can see Moore Mill & Lumber Co., which was the community's leading employer for many years.

The third picture was taken in 1957 as members of the Bandon Lions Club prepare for their annual beef barbecue in City Park. Long-time city attorney Myron Spady digs the pit for the meat, while Eddie Waldrop and his young daughter, Claudia, look on.

* * *

While going through Beckham's book this week, I saw a receipt from the old Bandon Surf newspaper, which was one of three newspapers in Bandon in 1913. The other two were the Bandon Recorder and the Western World (purchased by my grandfather in 1912). The Recorder closed in 1916, leaving the Western World as the town's only newspaper.

Under the words "The Bandon Surf" on a receipt, dated Dec. 1, 1913, it says: "A White Man's Newspaper Published in a White Man's Town and Patronized by White People."

Not too hard to understand why this racist newspaper did not last, no matter the era.

* * *

I was so sad to hear of the death of Christine Meyer Groh, 55, a member of the Bandon High School Class of 1982, who had fought so valiantly against cancer. Among her local survivors are her husband James, her mother Mary Meyer and her brother John Meyer.

Chris was loved by so many, and she will definitely be missed.

* * *

Marjorie Stephenson, Bandon's oldest citizen, celebrated her 105th birthday Friday.

Marjorie, who moved to Pacific View, a couple of months ago, took a bad fall recently when going out with her daughter, Carol Fugere, but hopefully she will recover quickly.

She is such an amazing woman.

* * *

The Pembina Pipeline Corporation, on behalf of the Jordan Cove project, has inundated the airways with advertising in the last couple of months.

What I really found interesting is that in the first set of ads, Pembina was pronounced with a prominent "b." But in the recent set of ads, ostensibly by someone whose family has worked for the company for years, he pronounces it Pemina ... without the "b" sound. For the sake of credibility, they might want to at least agree on how to pronounce the name of the company. Just a thought.

* * *

Not sure of the particulars, but fresh seafood lovers were sad to hear that Watson's Live Seafood, which previously operated out of the Port of Bandon's marketplace building, has gone out of business.

I understand that someone else may be taking it over, but until I can confirm it, I will wait on that announcement.

* * *

The City's codes compliance/enforcement officer Patrick Salandro gave notice that he is quitting to take a job with the school district, which I understand he has been hoping to get for quite awhile.

Patrick was making some real headway in addressing the gorse problem in the community, as well as other compliance issues, so hopefully we can replace him with someone who will emphasize the same problems.

* * *

I understand that all 300 tickets were sold out for Sunday's crab feed, but since I spent the afternoon writing my column, I did not attend. I generally write it on Sunday evening, but being the movie buff that I am, I had long ago decided that I would be watching the Academy Awards.

This Saturday, a group of us will be attending the annual Bite of Bandon. I also used to love the Chili Cook-off, but unfortunately, for the second or third year in a row, it is on the same night as Bite of Bandon, so I can't attend both.

* * *

Rod Willett recently posted a picture of himself with Henry Deetz, who was the band director at the high school in the early '60s (in both 1962 and 1963). Mr. Deetz is now living at Hope Village in Canby.

* * *

I recently learned that Andy Fraser, a popular physician's assistant with Coast Community Health Center, left Jan. 31, and is now with Central City Concern in Portland.

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