Coos Health & Wellness

COOS COUNTY — COVID-19 cases continue to spike in Coos County, with 10 confirmed or presumptive cases reported in the past eight days. There are currently 16 active cases and Coos Health & Wellness is monitoring 130 connected cases. A 5-year-old child was one of the confirmed cases this past week.

Some of the active cases are connected to an outbreak at Bandon Pacific Seafood processing plant in Charleston, according to Coos Health & Wellness Assistant Director and Public Information Officer Dr. Eric Gleason. The other two recent outbreaks, one of them involving an church in Coos County that was not identified, and the other outbreak also not identified, have been resolved, Gleason said.

As of Sept. 25, there are 109 confirmed cases and 43 presumptive* cases in Coos County for a total of 152 cases. Non-cases that tested negative total 6,883. There have been 28 cases in the last 30 days. There have been nine hospitalizations due to COVID-19 complications, but there are no current hospitalizations. 

There have been no deaths in Coos County due to COVID-19.

Specifics of the newest cases in the county include:

1. Adult 50-60, female, presumptive, linked to known cases, low exposure to others, isolating at home. Unknown underlying health conditions.

2. Adult over 60, female, presumptive, linked to known cases, low exposure to others, isolating at home. Underlying health conditions.

3. Adult under 40, female, presumptive, linked to known cases, moderate exposure to others, isolating at home. No underlying health conditions.

4. Adult over 60-70, male, confirmed, linked to known case, moderate exposure to others, isolating at home. No underlying health conditions. (Not a new case, previously reported as presumptive.)

5. Adult 50-60, male, confirmed, linked to known cases, high exposure to others, isolating at home. No underlying health conditions (Not a new case, previously reported as presumptive.)

6. Adult 50-60, female, confirmed, linked to known case, high exposure to others, isolating at home. No underlying health conditions. (Not a new case, previously reported as presumptive.)'

7. Child under 5, male, confirmed, linked to known cases, high exposure to others, isolating at home. No underlying health conditions. 

8. Adult under 20, male, presumptive, linked to known case, moderate exposure to others, isolating at home.

9. Adult 60-70, male, presumptive, linked to known case, high exposure to others, isolating at home.

10. Adult 40-50, male, confirmed, linked to known case, moderate exposure to others, isolating at home.

11. Adult 40-50, male, presumptive, linked to known case, high exposure to others, isolating at home.

* Presumptive cases are a close contact of a confirmed case AND have experienced specific symptoms consistent with COVID-19 BUT have not tested positive with a laboratory-confirmed test. This could mean they have not been tested, or they have tested negative. Due to the fact that a negative test does not rule out COVID-19, the Oregon Health Authority and the Coos County Public Health Division treats these persons as if they have been infected.

Gleason said the numbers may or may not reflect people who gathered over the Labor Day weekend, but that is unlikely since it's been a few weeks.

"(The current COVID-19 cases are) probably not (related), it’s a little late now to be attributed to Labor Day," Geason said in a weekly press briefing. "That doesn’t necessarily mean they can’t be in some way connected to someone’s Labor Day case."

Bandon Pacific Seafood's outbreak is getting close to a resolution. When it's been 28 days since the last illness related to the outbreak, that outbreak can be considered resolved, according to Coos Health & Wellness.

Still, the surge in Coos County in the past month tells officials at Coos Health & Wellness that people "still don't get it." 

"I think that while no matter how hard we try, again, to tell the community and inform the community that these are the things we need to do to stay safe, we can’t seem to wrap our minds around that fact that (when people) do things that (we) ask them not to do then the numbers go up," Gleason said.

"If the numbers continue to go up, our children are at risk of losing their ability to go to school, if they are in K-3," Gleason continued. "If we can’t stop ourselves from doing these things, the county could go backwards, the county could go back to Phase One, so all those individuals who are working diligently to ensure the safety of the people they’re around are also going to be drug back down to Phase One, those businesses that have done everything they can to stay open are going to have to work themselves back down to Phase One."

"It takes all of us to ensure that the things we want continue to happen, but only if we do the things that we need to do to continue to stay safe," Gleason said.

School reopening metrics

Coos Health & Wellness feels that keeping Coos County open and creating a safe environment for our children to return to in-person instruction at school are two very important goals. The state has set specific data points for both the counties and the state to reach before schools may reopen.

For all schools to return to in-person instruction the following metrics must be met three weeks in a row:

• Coos County Case Rate ≤10 cases per 100,000 population.

• Test positivity ≤5% in the preceding seven days.

• State Metric of test positivity ≤5% in the preceding seven days.

There is an exception for students in kindergarten to third grade to return to in-person instruction if the following metrics have been met three weeks in a row:

• Coos County test positivity is ≤5% in the preceding 7 days.

• Coos County case rate is ≤30 cases per 100,000 population.

Coos County COVID-19 weekly metrics

Week beginning Aug. 30: Case rate per 100,000 = 17.4; test positive rate = 1.8%

Week beginning Sept. 6: Case rate per 100,000 = 7.9; test positive rate = 1.7%

Week beginning Sept. 13: Case rate per 100,000 = 11.1; test positive rate = 1.0%

Oregon COVID-19 weekly metrics

Week beginning Aug. 30: Case rate per 100,000 = 35.4; test positive rate = 4.3%

Week beginning Sept. 6: Case rate per 100,000 = 30.9; test positive rate = 5.4%

Week beginning Sept. 13: Case rate per 100,000 = 34.8; test positive rate = 6.2%

Oregon, nation and world cases

Oregon Health Authority has reported 31,865 cumulative cases of COVID-19 (382 new cases) in Oregon, as well as 539 deaths to date (Sept. 24).

As of Sept. 24, CDC reported 6,916,292 total cases (41,310 new cases), 201,411 total deaths (1,136 new deaths ) and 302,715 cases in last seven days in the United States.

As of Sept. 24, the World Health Organization reports 31,798,308 confirmed cases (298,085 new cases) and 973,653 deaths (5,918 new deaths).

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