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BANDON - Abstract painters Jon Leach and Merv Cole, with Humbug Mountain Weavers and Spinners will be on display from Aug. 1-Sept. 30 at the Bandon Library Art Gallery, 1204 11th St. SW in City Park.

Leach and Cole bring a collection of abstracts to Bandon Library Art Gallery. Working in both acrylic and watercolors, they are well-matched in their aesthetic and equally strong in the execution of their ideas.

Leach shows with the library for the first time. His canvases are layered, subtle, dense and often demanding. Titles such as “Discovery: the musician's instruments had been stolen during the Solstice,” only deepen their mystery. Colors lie in pools, from which other colors rise and recede. There is something evocative of the sea in them, or the heavens, or the dark corners of the Earth. Take your time with these paintings.

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This is also Cole 's debut at the gallery. The two are good friends who enjoy showing their work together, but where Leach is restrained, Cole is exuberant. Where the motion and colors of Leach's paintings seem to move away from the viewer and recede deeper into the canvas, pulling us in after them, Cole's sweeping gestures all but fling the paint off the canvas in an abundance of energy.

But Leach's paintings can calm, too, and create a meditative space for viewers to contemplate the depths. In this collection, Leach's paintings are dark and complex, inviting us in. Cole's are bright and invite us to dance, but they are not simple. Both artists challenge and delight.

Humbug Mountain Weavers & Spinners bring a multitude of works of ingenuity and originality. Using found or recycled materials, these artisans weave not only wool, but plastic IV tubing and grocery bags, VHS tape and strips of surgical gowns, creating usable objects such as hats, bowls, and purses. With their expertise with spinning wheels and looms, they find ways to take materials that others throw away, and make useful items of them. They have salvaged discarded edges of fabrics, the waste that weaving cotton or wool creates, and made rugs and table runners. Examine these imaginative pieces, and rethink the meaning of the word “trash.”

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