Howdy everyone!

I hope you have been enjoying the stormy weather lately. It’s not great for business but it’s fun to be out and experiencing a Wet Coast winter this time of year!

New Guy Nick from Basin Tackle went out perch fishing last week and reports it was slow. We’re not sure if that was a product of conditions or if the bite did actually slow down. We’re hoping to get out soon and see.

Captain John and our Basin Tackle Pro-Staff have been catching steelhead on our local systems. It’s been slow but there are still fish to catch. The native steelhead are moving in and larger fish are being reported at this time. Ocean conditions remain too rough to play but there was a window last week and Matt and crew from the Wild Thing sport vessel made short work of lingcod and rockfish.

One of the crew, Mike, caught a beautiful fish we don’t really see too many of, the Tiger Rockfish. The reason Tiger Rockfish are rarely seen is because they exist in relatively small numbers compared to most other rockfish species due to their aggressive nature (they are bullies) and they also like deeper water than most folks like to fish. Starting at depths of about 60 feet the Tiger Rockfish will inhabit deep water reefs and rocky structure up to 1,000 feet down. Easily identified by its five deep red to black colored stripes with a pink to red colored body the Tiger Rockfish will grow to a maximum size of about 24 inches in length.

Perhaps the most interesting part of this fish is that it may take up to 120 years to get that big! Yep, one specimen has even been aged at 166 years old. To put it in perspective that fish hatched from a clutch of eggs among the rocks 11 years before the civil war started, when President Zachary Taylor died in office of a stomach related illness (maybe he ate some old fish?), and 11 years before Abraham Lincoln was elected president.

Whether you are eating really old fish tacos or throwing them back I hope to see you out there.

Rob Gensorek is the owner of Basin Tackle www.basintackle.com in the Charleston Marina and can be reached by phone at (541) 888-FISH, by Facebook at Basin Tackle Charleston, or e-mail at basin_tackle@yahoo.com. Robs fishing reports can be heard daily at 6:20 a.m. and 4:20 p.m. on KRSB Best Country 103 out of Roseburg  and his Basin Tackle Outdoor Show can be heard Wednesdays at 3 p.m. and Saturdays at 6 a.m. at kwro.com. In addition to all this he sometimes actually gets out and catches a fish or two.

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