Howdy everyone!

The warm weather and sunshine came back after our storm last week and my little ones and I have still been taking advantage of it, mostly by catching a LOT of crab. It’s still open in these parts despite a southern zone closure and it’s never been better out here. Y’all should come down and take advantage of it. Salmon is over, rockfish remains closed, but surf fishing is great and let me state again that crabbing is crazy hot.

While I’ve been crabbing off the docks with my little ones, we have been encountering all sorts of crazy creepy and cool critters and today we are going to talk about one of them. The subject du jour is a nudibranch which is basically a shell-less marine mollusk also known a sea slug. There are many types of nudibranch’s but the one that really caught our attention is called a “sea lemon.” While many of you boat owners out there have owned a sea lemon this one is entirely different. The sea lemon is yellow or orange and has a rough textured back with some black spots mixed in. This bright coloring serves as a warning to predators that they are poisonous and shouldn’t be eaten. Like most slugs and snails the sea lemon uses its raspy tongue or “radula” to scrape away at its food. These particular slugs like to feed on algae and sponges and have a short life span of only about a year.

In this time, these critters lay up to two million eggs and less than one percent of these will survive to adulthood. One last thing, the underside of these things is slimy. My seven year old wouldn’t touch it and my four year old found out the hard way. There is so much more to the docks in Charleston than just crab, come on down and see for yourself!

Before I leave you this week there is something I’ve been meaning to do for a while. I want to sincerely and deeply thank all the readers of this column and the editors that make this column possible. This weekly addition to the paper you now hold in your hand has been good for our business, good for our local community, and good for outdoor recreation in general. By far, however, the most important facet of this column to me is that it’s been good for my children. I have been including my little ones in my stories and articles more and more as time goes on and when the time arrives that I am long gone from this world my babies, hopefully then with babies of their own, will one day sit around a box full of newspaper clippings and share pictures and stories of their youth.

I can write these stories and print them out any time and I can take pictures and put copies in a shoe box, but there is nothing as real and palpable as an old newspaper clipping in ones hand to see and feel history. Every one of our stories, and every one of your stories, is part of the bigger story of America and part of that history. Thank you for sharing yourselves with us and thank you for allowing us to share ourselves with you.

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No matter what you are doing or where you are I hope to see you out there.

Rob Gensorek is the owner of Basin Tackle www.basintackle.com in the Charleston Marina and can be reached by phone at-541-888-FISH, by Facebook at Basin Tackle Charleston, or email at basin_tackle@yahoo.com. Robs fishing reports can be heard daily at 6:20 a.m. and 4:20 p.m. on KRSB Best Country 103 out of Roseburg and his Basin Tackle Outdoor Show can be heard Wednesdays at 3 p.m. and Saturdays at 6 a.m. at kwro.com. In addition to all this he sometimes actually gets out and catches a fish or two.

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